Get Your Coin Up: How To Successfully Ask For A Raise At Work

You’re rocking it out at work, but don’t quite feel your pay is up to par. At some point, we’ve all been there. A girl has to get her coin and wants to feel adequately compensated for high-level work output.   Learning the art and science behind how and when to ask for a raise can be tricky. Follow these rules and gain clarity to build your case for upping the ante.

Do the work

Before you start making demands for more pay, be sure you’re producing the results to back it up. Simply getting the job done isn’t going to cut it. Think about what you’ve done that has far exceeded the expectations of your superiors. Is your work performance unrecognizably surpassing that of your colleagues? If not, you may need to go back to the drawing board. Presenting facts about the cost of living, extra hours and meeting deadlines alone won’t always support the idea that you need more money if your work is mediocre at best. Make it clear that there is no comparison in the results you produce!

Do your research

That promotion you’ve been working hard for is so close you can smell it. Know what you’re asking for before waltzing into your boss’ office asking for more money. Don’t accept the job before doing your research. You keeping hearing “Know your worth” – but how do you find out what to ask? Do some research to support the dollar amount you plan to request.   Don’t just throw numbers around because they sound good. When conducting research, analyze actual salary surveys for professionals with similar education, experience and credentials. If you’re noticing disproportion, you need to speak up. Compile this information for your case review and use the facts to substantiate your claim for better pay.

Be confident

A hanging head and puppy dog eyes won’t help you rake in the big bucks. One reason women fail to earn the salaries they deserve is that they lack confidence in negotiating. Women, especially African American women, are far less likely to negotiate job offers. It’s not because we feel like we’re not worth more – we either don’t know how to ask or what to ask. Remember there are more perks to negotiate in addition to salary such as paid time off, flex time, telecommuting, projects, or job titles. If you typically get sweaty palms or anxiety in these situations, try practicing ahead of time. Incorporate ego boosters like your favorite girl anthem, quote or power pose to ramp up your self-esteem. Whatever you do, own it!

Speaking a raise into existence is not enough if you’re not walking the walk. The foundation you present for better pay has to be so rock solid that denying you is not an option. Show them the proof in your pudding is pretty damn sweet!

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on Hellobeautiful.com

5 Ways To Know Your Boss Is A Jerk

You’re fed up with work, but it isn’t your job that’s problem. It’s your boss!

Many employees find themselves stuck in a job they hate because of horrible leadership. These tips will help you decide if your boss is guilty of being a jerk.

She micromanages you

Businesswoman texting cell phone outside conference room meeting

You can’t send an email or add an event to your calendar without her telling you exactly how to do it. The question, “Why’d she hire me?” often crosses your mind. While we appreciate the guidance, employees want to feel trusted and valued – not incapable of completing mundane tasks without constant supervision.

She throws you under the bus

Businesswomen working in office

She’s never wrong. Even if the mishap is on her, she will never take ownership. A great boss would acknowledge how her mistake directly impacted your work output. She reprimands you as if she is completely oblivious to the fact that she caused the mess you’re in now. You hate playing the blame game so you keep working while quietly plotting 50 ways to pulverize her – in your mind, of course.

She’s bipolar

Failure is not final

She’s hot then cold. She’ll be on today and off tomorrow. You never know which person you’re going to get on any given day. She can be fun and joke with you about reality TV one minute then call you into her office to discuss how bad you’ve screwed up, the next. It’s a stressful situation and pushes you to your breaking point. Sometimes, you wonder if she’s threatened by you. Other times, you assure yourself that she is just simply incompetent and can’t help herself. Just when you decide to dust off your resume, she flips on the charm and starts singing your praises again.

She’s more of a boss than a leader

Depressed young woman using computer at the office

Bosses rule the roost and bark out orders. Leaders share the work, motivate you and are typically stellar communicators. You know for a fact that you’re dealing with a boss because she gets defensive about your suggestions for improvements during your one-on-one meetings. She can see fault in everyone around her but remains magically exempt from wrongdoing. Unless it’s her idea, it won’t work. When it does work, she takes full credit. She spends a lot of time preaching about teamwork but oftentimes leaves you out of any and all decisions that directly affect your job.

She doesn’t value your time

Anxious mixed race businesswoman rubbing temples in office

Yes, you have a meeting in three minutes, but she needs your help setting up an event she forgot was on her calendar. You could decline, but you’ll never hear the end of her rants about you’re not being a team player. To make matters worse, she embarks on a lengthy discussion about an upcoming project five minutes before quitting time. You reluctantly engage her while simultaneously hoping she can’t see the imaginary steam shooting from your ears. You’ve absolutely had enough when she “delegates” a project to you at the eleventh hour and has the nerve to leave early.

Many talent experts have confirmed very unsettling news that employees don’t leave bad jobs – they leave bad bosses. Don’t start your exit plan at the slightest instant of disagreement with your boss. Try and stick it out. If things don’t blow over, put your networking stilettos on and run for the hills!

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on Hellobeautiful.com

How To Ensure Work Life Balance

Woman working from home.

Even with a massive workload, there are ways to ensure your work-life balance remains intact. Here’s some tips to take you from the desk to that after work date in one swift click of a mouse.

Set boundaries

Pensive businesswoman looking out office window

There is nothing worse than dedicating eight plus hours to an employer, only to take a briefcase packed with work home with you. Know when to cut it off. Emergency situations may arise and you may encounter fires that need to be put out, but you must establish when enough is enough. If your work is interfering with your ability to maintain healthy relationships outside of work, you should implement a self-check. Those closest to you can often serve as sounding boards for venting, but it shouldn’t be an everyday occurrence. If you eat dinner with your family each evening or prefer not to take work calls on the weekends, let it be known. Set boundaries with your coworkers and help them understand that you’ll respond within 48 hours but unless someone’s hair is on fire, you are not to be interrupted during your Saturday spa day.

Plan your day

Mixed race woman working in shoe store

Making a list before your workday can help you prioritize and set timelines for your tasks. Not only does writing things down help organize your workflow, but it also helps clear your mind so you can be more productive. Making a list of your tasks gives you a sense of accomplishment. Checking items off your list provides visual evidence of the work you’ve done so you feel less guilty about rewarding yourself with a date night with your girls. Keep in mind that creating your plan is just the first step to taking control of your workday. The process is completely in vain if you don’t follow through with your plan. Be sure to set deadlines to hold yourself accountable.

Practice self-care

Mixed race woman getting hair cut

As a workingwoman, you can successfully manage stress by finding your happy place. Whether it’s reading a book, getting a massage or a weekly mani-pedi, find something that gives you the “me time” you need to rejuvenate. Stress impacts your ability to productively interact with others and make sound decisions. We can’t operate in constant stress no matter strong we are or how much we want to prove to others we can. Managing a career and home life simultaneously is not impossible if you pay attention when your body is waving the white flag. Keeping a journal of your feelings throughout your workday can help you manage your stress levels by identifying your triggers. You could discover that your emotions are best kept in check by handling certain tasks at different times of the day.

Maintaining a healthy work-life balance is beneficial to your mental and physical well-being. Women shouldn’t feel guilty for putting themselves first. By adjusting your habits of planning and recuperating, you really can have it all in your career and family.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

Chatty Cathy: Are You Driving Your Co-Workers Crazy By Being The Office Chatterbox?

A social butterfly is usually accused of being a “Chatty Cathy” when she doesn’t know when to cut the convo short. If your coworkers are truly busy, they don’t always have time to engage in meaningless chitchat at the water cooler or in the middle of drafting a time-sensitive email. Ask yourself these 3 questions to help you determine if you’re the office chatterbox.

How’s the body language?

Is your coworker actively listening to your relentless banter about what went wrong on your date from hell? Maybe you haven’t stopped to catch your breath long enough to realize she’s been shuffling paperwork on her desk or pretending to formulate the month-end report, hoping you can take a hint. Instead, you’re going off the deep end about how your Shih-Tzu hasn’t been potty trained. If she is avoiding eye contact during your conversation and seems super distracted, this is your cue to head back to your desk and do some work. You’ve just worn out your welcome.

Are they asking questions?

One surefire way to tell if she’s really interested in hearing about your weekend rendezvous is if she is asking questions. When the conversation is one-sided and she’s only giving you one-word answers with an occasional head nod, you’re probably one eye roll away from being told to “get to stepping.” Go ahead and cut it off when you see she’s lost interest. Ask her to reach out to you for the remainder of the story later. If she doesn’t follow up, don’t take it personal. She either wasn’t intrigued enough or had tons of work to complete before she missed her fast-approaching deadline.

Are they sitting or standing?

Most people sit when they are engaged in juicy conversation. Sitting also means they plan to stay for a little bit. If your coworker leaves her sitting position and begins pacing back and forth while getting things done in her office, what you’re talking about is probably going in one ear and out of the other. This is especially true if she stands and slowly guides you toward her door. She doesn’t want to get up close and personal with you, she is silently telling you she has things to do. Take heed to these nonverbal cues and suggest a lunch date or happy hour session after work to catch up.

It’s hard to find balance between being sociable and being a pest – being blunt and appearing rude. Sometimes women play too nice and can’t find their way out of unwanted conversations. Maybe we’ve all been guilty at one time or another, but save yourself the heartbreak of annoying your coworkers to the point they run for the hills when they see or hear you coming.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

How To Quit A Job You Hate Without Ruining Your Reputation

Stressed mixed race businesswoman rubbing her forehead

You’ve reached your breaking point.

All you can think about is chucking the deuces and saying to hellwith your dead end job. But you can’t.

While you know you can’t burn bridges, you can certainly make your exit just as jazzy as your entrance. Here’s how:

Update your resume

Keep a running list of your brag-worthy accomplishments. Nothing formal is required. You just can’t afford to omit any information from your resume that will help catapult you to a potential employer’s A-list. You’ll need to keep your resume up-to-date atall times, in case you’re asked for it on the fly. Be sure to have resumes on hand and also add a version to your smart phone or tablet. Creating professional business cards with a QR code linking to your resume or LinkedIn profile will “wow” your business contacts. Never get caught slipping.

Know the policy

Some companies have strict resignation policies. Failing to give proper notice could eliminate your eligibility to receive bonus payouts, pay for unused paid time off and could even affect your rehire status. Although there may also be an employment verification policy only to release dates of employment and position, there will always be that one employer eager to sing like a bird and give your potential new employer an earful about how horrible you are for leaving them hanging.

Rekindle old relationships

If you know you’re planning to re-enter the job market, go ahead and reconnect with old colleagues you’ve lost touch with after leaving your last job. Remind them of the great work you did in hopes they’ll serve as great resources and professional references during your job search. Get the scoop on who’s been promoted or what new positions may be available. Don’t get wrapped up in a gossip fest on this walk down memory lane – be strategic! Let your network know you’re looking for a new job and ask them to be on the lookout. Volunteering to help a previous colleague with a project or initiative could be the foot in the door you need for a new opportunity.

Stay focused

When you’ve sealed the deal on leaving your job, it’s easy to get complacent. Why continue working hard when your heart is no longer in it? Well, it’s simple – again, you don’t want to burn bridges. You’re poised and professional and need to be remembered as such. Never get so checked out that you forget how connected people are in your industry. Once word gets out that you’re a slacker, there’s no turning back. Take this time to complete your projects, finalize those contracts and purge any personal files you have at the office. Don’t let the negativity of your current job situation become your mindset.

Whatever your reason for wanting out of your current job, preparation is key. It’s a luxury to leave a job on your own terms, so why not make your exit with grace and dignity.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

Not Advancing At Work? It May Be Time For A Wardrobe Upgrade

Team leader with digital tablet

Whether you like it or not, your book will be judged by its cover. Not appearing professional and polished can limit opportunities to advance in your career. If you’re consistently missing the boat even though you’re qualified, your attire could be holding you back.

If these qualities ring true, we have some work to do.

You’re too relaxed

While you’re within dress code, you’re boring. Of course not every woman wants to wear skirts and heels – it’s possible to be professional without them. However, even if you prefer more masculine attire, dressing with purpose is still highly necessary.

You may be more comfortable in casual clothing but there are limits to what’s appropriate. Stay away from anything strapless, too athletic or screen-printed. If you work in an “anything goes” office, you still want to present a message widely accepted among decision makers. Research how other leaders dress at your company. Look and act like a leader in everything you do – if you want to be taken seriously. 

You blend in

Going against the grain with company culture isn’t always a bad thing. When competition is steep, focus on ways to stand out. Don’t go overboard with neon hair and tutus but think in terms of style and grace.

If you’re too monochromatic, it’s easy for others to assume this trend will be reflected in your work. Be the woman others admire and respect. Employers need to rest assured you’ll represent the company with poise and confidence. Dressing the part helps set the tone of your mental process. Rock that power suit like you own the place.

You’re too sexy

Cleavage and see-through and thighs…Oh my! You hold nothing back. Curves a-popping and heads a-turning is the story of your day. While making a statement is important, that statement should eloquently represent your professional brand. Make sure the sexiness of your clothing isn’t a constant distraction that overshadows your accomplishments.

First impressions are formed within the first 30 seconds of meeting someone. You can’t control what someone else thinks is sexy, but you can influence the image you portray. Wearing suggestive clothing can affect your income if you’re repeatedly denied promotions because your judgment and authority are in question.

From your head to your toes you have to be on point if you want to succeed in the workplace. Keep upward mobility and perception in mind when you select your attire. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

Check Yourself: If You’re Guilty Of These Habits, You May Be A Workplace Bully

Unimpressed HR woman filing a complaint

Workplace bullying is quite common and can be described as intimidating, threatening or intentionally sabotaging a coworker. While both men and women are perpetrators, women typically tend to target other women. This type of bullying should not be confused with occasional petty gossip in the break room.

If you’re not sure whether you’re an offender, keep reading.

You target the newbies

If a new employee starts in your office and you’re the first to stir the pot with your antics, you just might be a bully. You can’t wait to feed her with all of your negativity about who’s out to get her and how her job is on the line if she doesn’t do as you say. When this new employee makes a mistake, you are quick to belittle and create hell on Earth for her. When that isn’t enough, you rally the troops to assist in your mockery. Like a hungry pack of hyenas, you all band together in the foolishness.

You spread rumors

What if I told you some women choose to keep their personal business to themselves? Yes, these women exist and would rather focus on achieving goals versus succumbing to your poking and prodding for information. This upsets you because your life is a snore and you need to spill her tea to keep the focus away from your shortcomings. When she refuses to tell you anything, you make it up. And Lord forbid, she ignores you; You’ll immediately spaz out and plot her demise.

You remove all allies

It can be second nature for women in new positions to form allies at work to get them through rough patches. Finding another woman who gets her and is supportive enough to listen to her venting is like discovering the last pair designer shoes in her size is on sale. But wait! You’ve removed these allies by turning everyone against her, and it’s unnerving for her. Your main goal since she started has been to make sure everyone else steers clear of her. You can’t let anyone find out how awesome she is, can you? “Why would she do this to me?”, She might ask. Well, you’re territorial and need to control your work life. Maybe you’re a weakling at home, and you have to find a way to balance your issues.

You’re insecure

The new employee is a wiz. She’s smart, resourceful and a go-to person for leadership – everything you’re not. She’s a rule follower and her congeniality is very attractive to those around her. Of course, this threatens you because you do the bare-minimum and are well aware that your head could be on the chopping block if she outshines you. Although your prey is a confident, high-performer, she’s far from confrontational. You learned early on that your boss doesn’t like whiners so your bullying tactics go unnoticed, and this gives you LIFE!

Workplace bullies are not only your peers but can also be your supervisors or subordinates. If you take pride in bullying others, dig deep within to find the source of your issues and get some help. Make some self-adjustments and stop penalizing others for your inefficiencies.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

How To Use Stay-At-Home-Parent Work Experience To Get A Job

Woman working from home.

Being a stay-at-home mom is often misinterpreted as “I watch soap operas and play with my kids all day.”

This misconception can make it hard for moms to reenter the workforce. If you’re returning to work, you’ll need a resume that will prove your daily routine can help you rock it out in your new corporate gig. Here’s how you can build your resume to help highlight your skills and show employers you’re not just singing nursery rhymes and kissing babies.

Translate everyday tasks into work experience

It’s easy to imagine a stay at home mom as someone who makes forts and mud pies with her kids or kisses cute baby cheeks all day. This couldn’t be further from the truth. When returning to work, stay-at-home moms must educate employers about how they handle many of the same tasks as corporate professionals such as answering phones, processing paperwork, cleaning, managing budgets and providing customer service. Most moms will serve as tutors, mediators, accountants and relationship builders to ensure their families are equipped to thrive. It’s all in how you tell your story.

Use volunteer experience to fill the gaps

So you’re not clocking in at a 9-to-5 and getting paid, but you’re getting things done by supporting causes you believe in. Volunteering with community organizations or at a child’s school can quickly pack a stay-at-home mom’s schedule. Volunteer opportunities are great resume builders that offer the perfect way to fill employment gaps. This experience can be used to help stay-at-home moms stay up-to-date in their industries. Try registering for a free course with your local employment agency. Learning a new skill or networking while volunteering can help position stay-at-home moms for a job in the future.

Make money online

Those clothes and shoes your babies seem to grow out of overnight can be money makers if you play your cards right. Instead of trashing their personal items, try selling them online. This online business can easily fill any employment gaps stay-at-home moms experience after leaving the workplace. If others view you as the go-to person for all their questions about remedies or DIY projects, capitalize on this by creating a blog or advice column. There are many ways to monetize blogs these days and you’ll want to collect your coins to show employers you’re still capable of generating revenue.

You’re a lady boss and the glue that holds your family together – that’s a job! Opting to stay at home with your kids doesn’t have to be a death sentence for your career. Although returning to work will be an adjustment, you have the ability to change an employer’s perception by creating a compelling career story that communicates how you can help create success for any company.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

4 Stereotypes About Women In The Workplace (That Aren’t True)

Pensive businesswoman looking out office window

With the increase of women making power moves in the workplace, you’d think we’ve somehow overcome the stereotypes that have plagued us over the years. Here are some myth busters to prove women can be great leaders and have shattered the gendered expectations of cooking, cleaning and birthing children.

MYTH 1: Women lack leadership ability

Many women are nurturing, supportive, communicative and receptive to the emotions of others around them. This not only means that we can easily slip into the role of peacemaker and fixer, but leader as well. Despite what this man’s world tells us, this doesn’t make women weak, rather it provides additional evidence of our strength. Women executives have to work harder than their male counterparts because there are so few of us at the top. Collectively, this is a recipe for success in leading employees in the workplace. Employees like to work for leaders they can connect with. Happier employees create more profitable outcomes for companies nationwide.

MYTH 2: Hire a women and she’ll start a family and quit

When hiring women of child-bearing age, companies run the risk of losing them should those women decide to step away from the workplace to start a family. Keep in mind that being a homemaker isn’t every woman’s dream situation. Women can and should have it all if they so choose. For years women have climbed the corporate ladder while maintaining healthy family structures. It’s not easy but women are pretty awesome creatures and are unstoppable when their eyes are on the prize.

MYTH 3: Women are too emotional

Yes, women can be emotional; so can men. This in no way validates the assumption that a woman will fly off the handle after not getting her way or will burst into tears because someone hurt her feelings. Successful women keep those emotions in check and use them to benefit their companies. Women understand their customers spend more money where they feel they matter. Plus, their employees work harder because they feel more important than the company’s bottom line. Empathy is an attribute of the best women leaders and that is not easily taught.

MYTH 4: Women are bossy

The word bossy gets thrown around a lot when describing assertive women in the workplace. Bossy women tell others what to do. They make decisions on their own without consulting with the individuals affected. Assertive women take the initiative to research options, facilitate focus groups and move aggressively forward with their strategies to get the job done. A woman in leadership, who speaks up or holds her subordinates accountable for achieving goals, isn’t bossy. She’s just a BOSS!

Successful women listen, collaborate, motivate and build high-quality relationships to make things happen. It’s time for the world to get past these stereotypes and recognize women as the rock stars we were destined to be.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com

Help A Sister Out: Ways Women Can Help Each Other Get Ahead At Work

Ambition and a competitive spirit are what drive women to do better and achieve more in the workplace. This becomes a problem when that drive spirals out of control creating a full-on death match among coworkers. Here are some ways to transition that thinking from “dog eat dog” to cultivating successive paths to greatness.

Become a mentor

You rock it out in your job, right? So, instead of reveling in your coworker’s demise, reach out to her and propose a job shadowing opportunity to show her the ropes. Help foster an environment conducive to learning and sharing ideas. Mentorship can offer many benefits to the mentor and the mentee. It can create more job satisfaction, improved performance and stronger relationships. Make a positive impact by creating more badass lady bosses like you!

Share your story

When overwhelmed with a new job, some women can get wrapped up in the mindset of having no control over their own success. We think we’re the only ones experiencing challenges in the workplace. The next time you see a coworker on the brink of losing it, jump in and help. Share examples of how you prevailed in your time of despair in a new job. Be a sounding board and let your coworker know there is light at the end of the tunnel. At some point, you can both look back and take pride in how much you’ve progressed.

Stop hating

Making snarky comments to a new employee when she makes a mistake is not cool. Workplace bullying is primarily fueled by jealously and insecurity. Instead of focusing on how she’s dressed and whose eye she’s caught, channel those feelings of resentment into building a stronger team. While all employees are replaceable in some regard, your main goal in job security should not be rooted in your ability to sabotage your coworker’s reputation or employment. Sure, you’re vying for your spot as a leader in a male-dominated workplace, but you have to get a grip on your entitlement.

The only real competition you need to focus on is the woman you were yesterday. It’s not her experience, education, or designer stilettos holding you back. It’s you! The best leaders flourish by building each other up and providing help along the way.

Ashley Watkins, of Write Step Resumes, LLC, helps job seekers and career changers write their career dreams into reality one step at a time.  She can be found on FacebookTwitterInstagram, Pinterest, or via www.WriteStepResumes.com for resume help, interview prep, career tips, and motivational quotes. Click here to schedule a FREE consult today!

 

Originally posted on HelloBeautiful.com